Locrian♮2

Difficulty: Spectrum

The sixth mode of the Melodic Minor Scale is called the Locrian ♮2 (natural 2). Some call it the Locrian #2 which I fear is misleading, the 2nd degree of the Locrian is flat, but we're putting it back to its natural state not raising it.

The 'point' of this mode I guess is to play over min7b5 chords when you don't want the dissonance that you get from the b2 that occurs in the Locrian Mode (7th mode of the Major Scale). I tried real hard to get along with it, but the regular Locrian just sits better to my ear most of the time.

The scale formula for the Locrian Natural 2 is below, it describes the interval distances between each note of the scale. Note the 4 Tones in a row that help give this scale it's unique quality.

 

T

 

S

 

T

 

S

 

T

 

T

 

T

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

6

 

7

 

8


T = Tone [whole step] • S = Semitone [half step]

Comparison With Major Scale

Scales are always compared to the Major Scale to find the intervals used.

 

I

II

III

IV

V

VI

VII

I

C Major Scale

C

D

E

F

G

A

B

C

C Locrian♮2

C

D

Eb

Fb

Gb

Ab

Bb

C

Equation

1

2

b3

b4

b5

b6

b7

1

As the name suggests it's easiest to think of this as a Locrian Mode with a natural 2nd.

Chords And Extensions

Because we're thinking modally here we're looking at the individual chords you might use this scale over not the Chords In The Key of the Melodic Minor Scale.

This scale is played over min7b5 chords or (less common, but with a better fit) a min9b5 chord. I'd suggest getting a vamp (looper pedal!) of a min7b5 chord and then experiment with regular Locrian and then this and see what flicks your switch!

Melodic Minor Scale Modes

- LESSON STEPS -

Found an issue?

Please submit it. This will help me make constant improvements to better your experience.